West Bloomfield Township Public Library
⮜ More Featured Titles

Classics

These classic titles will make you love reading even more.

One hundred years of solitude by García Márquez, Gabriel

Tells the story of the Buendia family, set against the background of the evolution and eventual decadence of a small South American town

Pride and prejudice by Austen, Jane

To kill a mockingbird by Lee, Harper

The explosion of racial hate and violence in a small Alabama town in the 1930s is viewed by a little girl whose father defends a black man accused of rape

The great Gatsby by Fitzgerald, F

Bathtub gin, flappers and house parties that last all week enliven Fitzgerald's classic tale. Stylish and engaging, "The Great Gatsby" is also a startling literate portrait of Gatsby's search for meaning in his opulent world. In Jay Gatsby, Fitzgerald embodies some of America's strongest obsessions: wealth, power, greed, and the promise of new beginnings

I know why the caged bird sings by Angelou, Maya

Author's memoir of growing up black in the 1930's and 1940's

In cold blood : a true account of a multiple murder and its consequences by Capote, Truman

On November 15, 1959, in the small town of Holcomb, Kansas, four members of the Clutter family were savagely murdered by blasts from a shotgun held a few inches from their faces. There was no apparent motive for the crime, and there were almost no clues. As Truman Capote reconstructs the murder and the investigation that led to the capture, trial, and execution of the killers, he generates both mesmerizing suspense and astonishing empathy. In Cold Blood is a work that transcends its moment, yielding poignant insights into the nature of American violence

Brave new world by Huxley, Aldous

Huxley's classic prophetic novel describes the socialized horrors of a futuristic utopia devoid of individual freedom

I capture the castle by Smith, Dodie

A novel of an eccentric and impoverished English family whose home is a ruined 14th century castle. The story is presented in the form of a diary by the family's teen daughter

Jane Eyre by Brontë, Charlotte

In early nineteenth-century England, an orphaned young woman accepts employment as a governess at Thornfield Hall, a country estate owned by the mysteriously remote Mr. Rochester

Crime and punishment by Dostoyevsky, Fyodor

Rodion Romanovich Raskolnikov is a former law student living in extreme poverty in Saint Petersburg. Upon succumbing to his debt, he devises a plan to murder a wealthy, elderly pawnbroker. After Rodion commits the murders, he must address his guilt and decide whether his horrible sin was worth the sacrifice. This novel, considered the first of Fyodor Dostoevsky's mature writings, helped bring Dostoevsky to the forefront of Russian writers

The secret history by Tartt, Donna

The call of the wild ; and, White Fang by London, Jack

The Call Of The Wild is the story of Buck, a dog stolen from his home and thrust into the merciless life of the Arctic north to endure hardship, bitter cold, and the savage lawlessness of man and beast. White Fang is the adventure of an animal -- part dog, part wolf -- turned vicious by cruel abuse, then transformed by the patience and affection of one man

The Chrysalids by Wyndham, John

Persuasion by Austen, Jane

Moby Dick by Melville, Herman

Widely considered one of the great American novels, Herman Melville's masterpiece went largely unread during his lifetime and was out of print at the time of his death in 1891. Called the greatest book about the sea ever written by D.H. Lawrence, Moby Dick features detailed descriptions of whale hunting and whale oil extraction as well as beautiful, incisive writing on race, class, religion, art, and society. The story, loosely based on a real whaling shipwreck, features the unforgettable, vengeful Captain Ahab, who obsessively hunts a great white whale who bit his leg off below the knee

The lion, the witch, and the wardrobe by Lewis, C

Four English schoolchildren find their way through the back of a wardrobe into the magic land of Narnia and assist Aslan, the golden lion, to triumph over the White Witch, who has cursed the land with eternal winter

To the lighthouse by Woolf, Virginia

Broken apart into three sections with a nearby lighthouse serving as the novel's constant, Virginia Woolf's modernist classic To The Lighthouse revolves around the Ramsays and their summer home on the shores of Scotland

The death of the heart by Bowen, Elizabeth

Their eyes were watching God by Hurston, Zora Neale

When Janie Starks returns to her rural Florida home, her small black community is overwhelmed with curiosity about her relationship with a younger man

Frankenstein, or, The modern Prometheus by Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft

The Master and Margarita by Kemp, Edward

A mysterious stranger appears in a Moscow park. Soon he and his retinue have astonished the locals with the magic show to end all magic shows. But why are they really here, and what has it got todo with the beautiful Margarita, or her lover, the Master, a silenced writer? A carnival for the senses and a diabolical extravaganza, this most exuberant of Russian novels was staged in this adaptation at Chichester Festival Theatre

The go-between by Hartley, L

One flew over the cuckoo's nest by Kesey, Ken

McMurphy, a criminal who feigns insanity, is admitted to a mental hospital where he challenges the autocratic authority of the head nurse

1984 by Orwell, George

Satirical novel about people living in a collectivist society, pressed by Thought police into believing ignorance is strength and war is peace

Buddenbrooks : the decline of a family by Mann, Thomas

The story of four generations of a wealthy bourgeois family in northern Germany captures the triumphs and tragedies, successes and failures, relationships, loves, and ordinary events of everyday middle-class life

The grapes of wrath by Steinbeck, John

A novel about the plight of American farmers who were forced off their farms by drought and foreclosure during the 1930's

Beloved by Morrison, Toni

Staring unflinchingly into the abyss of slavery, this spellbinding novel transforms history into a story as powerful as Exodus and as intimate as a lullaby. Sethe, its protagonist, was born a slave and escaped to Ohio, but eighteen years later she is still not free. She has too many memories of Sweet Home, the beautiful farm where so many hideous things happened. And Sethe's new home is haunted by the ghost of her baby, who died nameless and whose tombstone is engraved with a single word: Beloved. Filled with bitter poetry and suspense as taut as a rope, Beloved is a towering achievement. After the Civil War ends, Sethe longingly recalls the two-year-old daughter whom she killed when threatened with recapture after escaping from slavery 18 years before

The code of the Woosters by Wodehouse, P

Jeeves helps extricate Bertie Wooster from the many undignified situations he finds himself in

Roots : the saga of an American family by Haley, Alex

It begins with a birth in an African village in 1750, and ends two centuries later at a funeral in Arkansas. And in that time span, an unforgettable cast of men, women, and children come to life, many of them based on the people from Alex Haley's own family tree. When Alex was a boy growing up in Tennessee, his grandmother used to tell him stories about their family, stories that went way back to a man she called the African who was taken aboard a slave ship bound for Colonial America. As an adult, Alex spent twelve years searching for documentation that might authenticate what his grandmother had told him. In an astonishing feat of genealogical detective work, he discovered the name of the "African"--Kunta Kinte--as well as the exact location of the village in West Africa from where he was abducted in 1767. Roots is based on the facts of his ancestry, and the six generations of people

Dracula . by Stoker, Bram

During a business visit to Count Dracula's castle in Transylvania, a young English solicitor finds himself at the center of a series of horrifying incidents. Jonathan Harker is attacked by three phantom women, observes the Count's transformation from human to bat form, and discovers puncture wounds on his own neck that seem to have been made by teeth. Harker returns home upon his escape from Dracula's grim fortress, but a friend's strange malady — involving sleepwalking, inexplicable blood loss, and mysterious throat wounds — initiates a frantic vampire hunt. The popularity of Bram Stoker's 1897 horror romance is as deathless as any vampire. Its supernatural appeal has spawned a host of film and stage adaptations, and more than a century after its initial publication, it continues to hold readers spellbound

The fellowship of the ring : being the first part of the lord of the rings by Tolkien, J

Passing by Larsen, Nella

Married to a successful physician and prominently ensconced in Harlem's vibrant society of the 1920s, Irene Redfield leads a charmed existence-until she is shaken out of it by a chance encounter with a childhood friend who has been "passing for white."

The adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Twain, Mark

Huck tells of his adventures travelling down the Mississippi on a raft with an escaped slave, and of the many people they encounter, including a pair of swindlers and two families in a feud

Great expectations by Dickens, Charles

Catch-22 by Heller, Joseph

Set in the closing months of World War II in an American bomber squadron on a small island off Italy, a bombadier named Yossarian is frantic and furious because thousands of people he hasn't even met keep trying to kill him. He has decided to live forever, even if he has to die in the attempt

The Age of Innocence by Wharton, Edith

The first Pulitzer Prize for literature awarded to a woman was for The age of innocence, Edith Wharton's elegant portrait of desire and betrayal in Old New York. In the highest circle of New York social life during the 1870s, Newland Archer, a young lawyer, prepares to marry the docile May Welland. But before their engagement is announced, he meets the mysterious, nonconformist Countess Ellen Olenska, May's cousin, who has returned to New York after a long absence. Ellen mirrors his own sense of disillusionment with society and the "good marriage" he is about to embark upon and provokes a moral struggle within him as he continues to go through the motions. A social commentary of surprising compassion and insight, The age of innocence toes the line between the comedy of manners and the tragedy of thwarted love

Things fall apart by Achebe, Chinua

The contemporary African writer's classic novel depicting the destruction of traditional tribal life by the white man

Middlemarch by Eliot, George

In nineteenth-century England, Dorthea Brooke's wishes to defy social conventions are inhibited by the strict nature of her surroundings

Midnight's children by Rushdie, Salman

"A classic novel, in which the man who calls himself the 'Bomb of Bombay' chronicles the story of a child and a nation that both came into existence in 194 -- and examines a whole people's capacity for carrying inherited myths and inventing new ones."--Publisher's description

Autobiographies: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave/My Bondage and My Freedom/Life and Times by Douglass, Frederick

The Iliad by Homer

A new translation of Homer's ancient masterpiece endeavors to instill the poetic nature of its original language while retaining accuracy, readability, and character vibrancy

Vanity Fair by Thackeray, William Makepeace

Amelia Sedley, daughter of a wealthy merchant, has a loving mother to supervise her courtship. Becky Sharp, an orphan, has to use her wit, charm, and resourcefulness to escape from her destiny as a governess. This she does ruthlessly, musing: 'I think I could become a good woman, if I had five thousand a year'. Thackeray's story is set at the time of the battle of Waterloo, in which the Sedley fortunes are lost and Amelia is back to square one while Becky rises with contemptuous ease

Brideshead revisited : the sacred and profane memories of Captain Charles Ryder by Waugh, Evelyn

Captain Charles Ryder, stationed at Brideshead, recalls his boyhood associations with the odd but charming members of an English noble family

The catcher in the rye by Salinger, J

In an effort to escape the hypocrisies of life at his boarding school, sixteen-year-old Holden Caulfield seeks refuge in New York City.

Alice's adventures in Wonderland by Carroll, Lewis

Alice falls down a rabbit hole and discovers a world of nonsensical and amusing characters

A lesson before dying by Gaines, Ernest J

A Lesson before dying, is set in a small Cajun community in the late 1940s. Jefferson, a young black man, is an unwitting party to a liquor store shoot out in which three men are killed; the only survivor, he is convicted of murder and sentenced to death. Grant Wiggins, who left his hometown for the university, has returned to the plantation school to teach. As he struggles with his decision whether to stay or escape to another state, his aunt and Jefferson's godmother persuade him to visit Jefferson in his cell and impart his learning and his pride to Jefferson before his death. In the end, the two men forge a bond as they both come to understand the simple heroism of resisting--and defying--the expected

The mill on the Floss by Eliot, George

Maggie Tulliver has two lovers; Philip Wakem, son of her father's enemy; and Stephen Guest, already promised to her cousin. But the love she wants most in the world is that of her brother Tom. Maggie's struggle against her passionate and sensual nature leads her to a deeper understanding and to eventual tragedy

Barchester Towers by Trollope, Anthony

Barchester Towers, the sequel to The Warden, is the second novel in Trollope's major series, the Chronicles of Barsetshire. It focuses on the power struggle between Archdeacon Grantly, Mr. Slope and the Proudies as they fight for control of the diocese of Barchester. Meanwhile, another struggle is taking place for the heart of Eleanor Bold. Who will win her? The vile Mr. Slope, the idling Bertie Stanhope or someone else entirely? This is a witty and sparkling novel about greed, hate and love; Trollope captures the intricacy of human emotion and character with warmth, humour, wonderful characterisation and, of course, perfect dialogue

Another country by Baldwin, James

Eight people become entangled in a web of interpersonal relationships, doomed to become as savage and destructive as the society which oppresses them

Les misérables by Hugo, Victor

Imprisoned for stealing a loaf of bread, Jean Valjean is finally released and struggles to build a new life, but the relentless police Inspector Javert is determined to put him back in jail, forcing Jean to go into hiding

Charlie and the chocolate factory by Dahl, Roald

Each of five children lucky enough to discover an entry ticket into Mr. Willy Wonka's mysterious chocolate factory takes advantage of the situation in his own way

The Outsiders by Hinton, S

The struggle of three brothers to stay together after their parent's death and their quest for identity among the conflicting values of their adolescent society

The Count of Monte Cristo by Dumas, Alexandre

Edmund Dantès, betrayed by his enemies and unjustly convicted of aiding the exiled Napoleon, escapes after fourteen years of imprisonment in the Château d'If and embarks on a carefully crafted plot to seek his revenge

Ulysses by Joyce, James

This story captures a day in the life of an Everyman in turn-of-the-century Dublin. Obliquely borrowing characters and situations from Homer's Odyssey, Joyce takes us on an internal odyssey along the current of thoughts, impressions, and experiences that make up the adventure of living an average day. As his characters stroll, eat, ruminate, and argue through the streets of Dublin, Joyce's narrative weaves events, emotions, and memories in a free flow of imagery and associations

East of Eden by Steinbeck, John

The brothers Karamazov by Dostoyevsky, Fyodor

The last and greatest of Dostoevsky's novels, The Brothers Karamazov is a towering masterpiece of literature, philosophy, psychology, and religion. It tells the story of intellectual Ivan, sensual Dmitri, and idealistic Alyosha Karamazov, who collide in the wake of their despicable father's brutal murder. Into the framework of the story Dostoevsky poured all of his deepest concerns -- the origin of evil, the nature of freedom, the craving for meaning and, most importantly, whether or not God exists. The novel is particularly famous for three chapters that rank among the greatest pages of Western literature: "Rebellion" and "The Grand Inquisitor" present what many have considered the strongest arguments ever formulated against the existence of God, while "The Devil" brilliantly portrays the banality of evil. Ultimately, Dostoevsky believes that Christ-like love prevails. But does he prove it? A rich, moving exploration of critical human questions, The Brothers Karamazov challenges all readers to reevaluate the world and their place in it

Lolita by Nabokov, Vladimir Vladimirovich

When it was published in 1955, Lolita immediately became a cause célèbre because of the freedom and sophistication with which it handled the unusual erotic predilections of its protagonist. But Vladimir Nabokov's wise, ironic, elegant masterpiece owes its stature as one of the twentieth century's novels of record not to the controversy its material aroused but to its author's use of that material to tell a love story almost shocking in its beauty and tenderness. Awe and exhilaration--along with heartbreak and mordant wit abound in this account of the aging Humbert Humbert's obsessive, devouring, and doomed passion for the nymphet Dolores Haze. Lolita is also the story of a hypercivilized European colliding with the cheerful barbarism of postwar America, but most of all, it is a meditation on love, love as outrage and hallucination, madness and transformation

Quicksand by Larsen, Nella

The secret garden by Burnett, Frances Hodgson

"The Secret Garden" is considered a classic of children's fiction and remains one of Frances Hodgson Burnett's most popular works. A heart-warming, beautifully-told story of a lonely orphan girl who goes to live with her uncle in an intimidating British manor house. "The Secret Garden" has been enjoyed by children for over a century and continues to be a popular choice for bedtime reading. Frances Eliza Hodgson Burnett (1849-1924) was a British-born American playwright and novelist most famous for her children's novels "Little Lord Fauntleroy" (1886), "A Little Princess" (1905), and "The Secret Garden" (1911). Read & Co. are republishing this classic children's book in a modern, high-quality edition complete with a specially-commissioned new biography of the author

A tale of two cities : a story of the French Revolution by Dickens, Charles

The grim tale of the people who were caught up in the wave of violence and murder which marked the French Revolution

The diary of a nobody by Grossmith, George

Says Charles Pooter, "I fail to see-because I do not happen to be a 'somebody'-why my diary should not be interesting." Surprisingly, Mr. Pooter's life is fascinating! The fascination is two-fold: firstly, his astounding arrogance that we should care about his domestic trivia and narcissistic scribblings. Secondly, we can all sympathize with (and wince at!) this ridiculous slave to convention. Above all, Mr. Pooter's life is funny! His constant battles with tradesmen, his pathetic pride and banal wit, his clashes with his carefree son, his absurd social crises and petty dilemmas: all are part of Mr. Pooter's life as a worried, proud, and anxious Nobody. Listeners are certain to learn why Hilaire Belloc asserted that Pooter was "an immortal achievement."

Anna Karenina : a novel in eight parts by Tolstoy, Leo

Beautiful and charming, Anna lives in a splendid world of her own making. She smokes, rides horseback, plays tennis, takes opium, practices birth control, and--although she is already married--falls in love with a handsome army officer. Anna's life is played out against a backdrop of dazzling balls and the vastness of Russia's landscape

Orlando : a biography by Woolf, Virginia

Kindred by Butler, Octavia E

Dana, a modern African-American woman, is is snatched abruptly from her home in 1976 California and transported to the antebellum South in order to save the life of a white slave owner

Atlas shrugged by Rand, Ayn

This is the story of a man who said that he would stop the motor of the world--and did. Is he a destroyer or a liberator? Why does he fight his hardest battle not against his enemies but against the woman he loves? Tremendous in scope, breathtaking in its suspense, Atlas Shrugged is Ayn Rand's magnum opus, which launched an ideology and a movement. With the publication of this work in 1957, Rand gained an instant following and became a phenomenon. Atlas Shrugged emerged as a premier moral apologia for capitalism, a defense that had an electrifying effect on millions of readers-and now listeners-who had never heard capitalism defended in other than technical terms

The time machine by Wells, H

Presents the classic tale depicting the adventures of the time traveler whose fantastic invention carries him into the world of the future

The art of war by Sunzi, active

Jazz by Morrison, Toni

Violet and Joe Trace, a black couple who left Vesper County, VA in 1926 find twenty years later that they are without words or ambition. Their child was loved then murdered by Joe, defamed then maimed by Violet. As Joe and Violet search for the reality of who their daughter was, they arrive at a quiet but powerful redemption

The Forsyte saga by Galsworthy, John

John Galsworthy, a Nobel Prize-winning author, chronicles the ebbing social power of the commercial upper-middle-class Forsyte family through three generations, beginning in Victorian London during the 1880s and ending in the early 1920s

Travels with Charley : in search of America by Steinbeck, John

Tropic of cancer by Miller, Henry

Women in love by Lawrence, D

"Let us hesitate no longer to announce that the sensual passions and mysteries are equally sacred with the spiritual mysteries and passions," wrote D. H. Lawrence in Women in Love, his masterpiece heralding the erotic consciousness of the twentieth century. Lawrence explores love, sex, passion, and marriage through the eyes of two sisters, Gudrun and Ursula Brangwen. Intelligent, incisive, and observant, the two very different sisters pursue thrilling, torrid affairs with their lovers, Rupert and Gerald, while searching for more mature emotional relationships. Against a haunting World War I backdrop of coal mines, factories, and a beleaguered working class, Gudrun and Ursula's temperamental differences spark an ongoing debate regarding their society, their inner lives, and the mysteries between men and women. Lawrence considered this to be his best novel

The wind in the willows by Grahame, Kenneth

Presents the escapades of four animal friends--Toad, Mole, Rat, and Badger--who live along a river in the English countryside

My Ántonia by Cather, Willa

My Ántonia chronicles the life of Ántonia, a Bohemian immigrant woman, as seen through the eyes of Jim, the man unable to forget her. Jim, now a successful New York lawyer, recollects his upbringing on a Nebraska farm. Even after twenty years, Ántonia continues to live a romantic life in his imagination. When he returns to Nebraska, he finds Ántonia has lived a battered life. Although the man to whom she dedicated her life abandons her, she remains strong and full of courage

Wuthering Heights by Brontë, Emily

Perfume : the story of a murderer by Süskind, Patrick

War and peace by Tolstoy, Leo

War and Peace chronicles the history of the French invasion of Russia and the impact of the Napoleonic era on Tsarist society through the stories of five Russian aristocratic families. Tolstoy said War and Peace is not a novel, even less is it a poem, and still less a historical chronicle. Large sections, especially the later chapters, are a philosophical discussion rather than narrative. Tolstoy also said that the best Russian literature does not conform to standards and hence hesitated to call War and Peace a novel. Instead, he regarded Anna Karenina as his first true novel. According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, no single English novel attains the universality of Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace

The color purple by Walker, Alice

The lives of two sisters--Nettie, a missionary in Africa, and Celie, a southern woman married to a man she hates--are revealed in a series of letters exchanged over thirty years

Of human bondage by Maugham, W

Bleak House by Dickens, Charles

The novel follows the fortunes of three characters, Esther Summerson, Ada Clare, and Richard Carstone, and the relations of these three young people in the Jarndyce household. The story they tell embodies Dickens's merciless indicment of the Court of Chancery and its bungling, morally corrupt handling of the endless case of Jarndyce v. Jarndyce, giving the novel its scope and meaning. Included is one of Dickens's most savage judgements on an indifferent society

Breakfast of champions, or, Goodbye blue Monday! by Vonnegut, Kurt

A Christmas carol by Dickens, Charles

A miser learns the true meaning of Christmas when three ghostly visitors review his past and foretell his future

Silas Marner by Eliot, George

Disappointed in friendship and love, and embittered by a false accusation, weaver Silas Marner retreats from the world with his loom, but soon finds his monastic existence forever changed by the arrival of an orphaned girl, whom he takes in and raises ashis own daughter.

Mrs. Dalloway by Woolf, Virginia

Adeline Virginia Woolf ( 1882 - 28th March 1941) is one of Britain's leading literary talents and a pioneer of modernist writing especially 'stream of consciousness' which provides the reader with the flow of thoughts from the naked inner voice without any filter, order or arrangement. She overcame sexual abuse from her brothers, the death of her mother and then sister in her childhood but it was the death of her father as a young adult that institutionalised her. These dark emotional episodes were to reappear at different times throughout her life but did not prevent her prolific output of some of the most poignant and poetic prose ever written. Mrs. Dalloway is often thought of as one of Woolf's most brilliant novels and was the basis of the award winning film The Hours. It takes place on a June day in post WWI London where wealthy socialite Clarissa Dalloway is preoccupied with the finishing touches to her party. She considers those that will be attending her party that evening, past loves, people who have touched her life, a re-evaluation of her practical marriage and her hesitancy in growing old. These flashbacks, reminiscences and memories conjure up a vivid and insightful portrait that make this a riveting read and a classic work by a brilliant author at the top of her game

Little women by Alcott, Louisa May

The lives and adventures of the four March sisters--Jo, Meg, Beth, and Amy--are set against the backdrop of nineteenth-century New England while their father is off fighting in the Civil War

The sea, the sea by Murdoch, Iris

After a brilliant and fulfilling career, Charles Arrowby revels in his perfect refuge, an isolated home by the sea, but soon his complex past makes unbidden visits

The godfather by Puzo, Mario

The leader, Vito Corleone, is the Godfather. He is a benevolent despot who stops at nothing to gain and hold power. His command post is a fortress on Long Island from which he presides over a vast underground empire that includes the rackets, gambling, bookmaking, and unions. His influence runs through all levels of American society, from the cop on the beat to the nation's mighty

The castle by Kafka, Franz

A fantasy novel, depicting human attempts to arrive closer to God, considered to be a symbolic classic

Peter Pan by Barrie, J

Follows the adventures of Peter Pan, the boy who would not grow up.

A confederacy of dunces by Toole, John Kennedy

The return of the native by Hardy, Thomas

Clym Yeobright, a diamond merchant in Paris, returns to his home in Egdon where he falls in love with the sensuous Eustacia Vye. She marries him, hoping he will take her away to Paris. But Eustacia's dreams of escape are not to be realized. Clym Yeobright, the returning native, cannot bring her salvation

A portrait of the artist as a young man by Joyce, James

The classic novel follows Stephen Dedalus from his days as a student at the Clongowes Wood School, to the deep religious conflict he experiences at a day school in Dublin, to his college years during which he challenges the conventions of his upbringing

Heart of darkness by Conrad, Joseph

A journey up the river in the Belgian Congo is also a journey into the darkest part of a man's soul

North and South by Gaskell, Elizabeth Cleghorn

North and South is a novel that exposed Victorian inequalities. Margaret Hale, a woman from the South of England, moves to the industrialized North of England where she is shocked by the huge inequalities between the rich and the working class. This serves as a backdrop for a conflicted love story. Margaret finds herself falling in love with John Thornton, the owner of the local mill. But her concern for the Mill's striking workers complicates the relationship. A classic tale of class and love

The handmaid's tale by Atwood, Margaret

"Margaret Atwood's best-loved novel has taken the world by storm again. Riding high on bestseller lists for months and the basis for Hulu's Emmy and Golden Globe Award-winning smash hit series, The Handmaid's Tale is everywhere--and it's primed for a stunning new graphic novel adaptation. The story is iconic: In the Republic of Gilead, a Handmaid named Offred lives in the home of the Commander, to the purpose that she become pregnant with his child. Stripped of her most basic freedoms, (work, property, her own name), Offred remembers a different time, not so long ago, when she was valuable for more than her viable ovaries, when she was mother to a daughter she could keep, and when she and her husband lived and loved as equals. Darkly prescient, scathinglysarcastic, and eminently frightening, The Handmaid's Tale has only gained relevance since it was originally published, and remains one of the most powerful, widely read stories of our times. This illustrated edition is a must-have for Atwood's growing legions of fans"--

Suite française : a novel by Némirovsky, Irène

A lost masterpiece of French literature, this epic novel of life under Nazi occupation was discovered 62 years after the author's tragic death at Auschwitz. Two parts of a planned five-part novel that was never completely finished due to the death of it's Jewish author during World War II. The first part, "A storm in June," is set in the chaos and mayhem of the massive 1940 exodus from Paris on the eve of the Nazi invasion. Part Two, "Dolce," is set in a German-occupied village rife with resentment, resistance, and collaboration

Invisible man by Ellison, Ralph

In the course of his wanderings from a Southern Negro college to New York's Harlem, an American black man becomes involved in a series of adventures. Introduction explains circumstances under which the book was written. Ellison won the National Book Award for this searing record of a black man's journey through contemporary America. Unquestionably, Ellison's book is a work of extraordinary intensity--powerfully imagined and written with a savage, wryly humorous gusto

One day in the life of Ivan Denisovich by

Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance : an inquiry into values by Pirsig, Robert M

A father and son embark on a life-altering motorcycle trip through America. For nearly two weeks, they travel together and soon discover philosophical depths within themselves that they never knew existed

Hard times by Dickens, Charles

⮜ More Featured Titles
National Medal Recipient of the National Medal, the nation's highest honor for libraries.